From The Archive of Struggle no.42

Just a short one.

AAAARG.ORG:

Maurice Brinton: The Bolsheviks and Workers’ Control

Pierre Broue: The German Revolution 1917-1923

Colin A. Palmer: Eric Williams & the Making of the Modern Caribbean

Anton Pannekoek : Lenin as Philosopher: A Critical Examination of the Philosophical Basis of Leninism

Anton Pannekoek and John Holloway: Pannekoek on Organisation (Introduced by John Holloway)

Ernest Mandel: An Introducion to Marxist Economic Theory//Late Capitalism

Marcel van der Linden: Western Marxism and the Soviet Union (Historical Materialism Book Series)//Workers of the World// Workers of the World: Essays toward a Global Labor History

See also another index at AGT.

Also:

World Labor News:

*G. P. Maximoff: Constructive Anarchism – The Debate on the Platform (1930)

Peace Pledge Union:

*Albert Camus: Neither Victim Nor Executioner (politics, 1947)

Anarchist Library:

*Voline: (The) Unknown Revolution, 1917-1921. (1947)

**Book One. Birth, Growth and Triumph of the Revolution
**Book Two. Bolshevism and Anarchism
**Book Three. Struggle for the Real Social Revolution

*Pjotr Arshinov: The Two Octobers (1927)

Below the fold, more via Ent.: (more…)

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From the archive of struggle no.37

In previous issues, I have featured the Labadie Collection, the Holt Labor Library, and other American archives. Today, we turn to Ireland.

The MultiText Project in History is an innovative educational project, brought to you by the History Department, University College Cork. It is the largest and most ambitious project undertaken by any university to provide resources for students of Modern Irish History at all levels: University students, the general reader, and second-level students. The project aims to publish a minimum of 12 books, each dealing with a separate period of Irish history. Each book contains accounts of key personalities, concepts, and detailed elucidations of some case studies in the period.

Among the project’s galleries are one on James Connolly and one on James Larkin, and a case study of the 1913 strike and lockout in Dublin . Here are some of the features:

Farewell dinner for Connolly, New York, 1910.
Farewell dinner for Connolly, New York, 1910.
Farewell dinner on the occasion of Connolly’s departure from New York to return to Dublin, 14 July 1910.
Election leaflet in Yiddish.
Election leaflet in Yiddish.
Election leaflet in Yiddish in support of James Connolly in his campaign for election to Dublin Corporation for the Wood Quay Ward in 1902.
Moscow3
Larkin in Moscow as representative of the Workers’ Union of Ireland at the Fifth Congress of the Comintern.

From the archive of struggle, no.36: radical America

Last week, I featured the Holt Labor Library. Today, I feature a few different American radical history archives with smaller on-line exhibitions. Other stuff below the fold. Browse the whole series here.

The George Meany Memorial Archives

“The American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) established the George Meany Memorial Archives in 1980 to honor the memory of George Meany, its first president, and to provide a program to preserve its historical records and make them available for research. In 1987 the archives moved from the AFL-CIO headquarters to the forty-seven acre campus of the George Meany Center for Labor Studies (now the National Labor College) in Silver Spring, Maryland, an educational institution for labor officers, representatives, and staff of AFL-CIO affiliates.”

On-line exhibit: A. Philip Randolph, 1889-1979.

Illinois Labor History Society

“The Illinois Labor History Society (ILHS) was formed on August 5, 1969 in the office of the late Joseph M. Jacobs, attorney for the Chicago Teachers Union, Meatcutters, and other labor organizations. The mission of the ILHS was set forth: It shall be the Purpose of the Illinois Labor History Society to encourage the preservation and study of labor history materials of the Illinois Region, and to arouse public interest in the profound significance of the past to the present.”

On-line exhibit: Labor Union Hall of Fame.

Indiana State University Debs Collection

The Debs Collection has an absolutely enormous amount of Eugene Debs material. The photos and videos are of particular interest. This is apparently the only known video of Debs.

Inkworks Press Archive

Inkworks is a leftie print co-op in the Bay area. Their poster archive includes many treasures dating from 1974 onwards. Earlier material includes cool posters for UFW salsa benefits, Chilean folk music gigs, Cinco de Mayo fiestas, Pablo Neruda woodcuts, and lots more. A little bit on a Stalinist/Second Campist/Third Worldist tip, but beautiful.

LARC

The Labor Archives and Research Center in San Francisco: “Few regions can rival the rich, lively labor history of the San Francisco Bay Area. This history is preserved in primary source and vintage history materials at the Labor Archives and Research Center (LARC). Founded in 1985 by trade union leaders, historians, labor activists and university administrators, the Labor Archives is a unit of the J. Paul Leonard Library at San Francisco State University.”

Two on-line exhibitions: Look for the Union Label: A Celebration of Union Logos and Emblems and Cultivating Creativity: The Arts and the Farm Workers’ Movement During the 1960s and 1970s. The first is just lots of labels, badges and such like. The second is awesome, with sections on the Farm Workers Logo, the Virgin of Guadalupe, Theater, Songs and Poems, El Malcriado (the UFW paper), Posters, Drawings and Murals, Photography and Cesar Chavez as Icon.

Brandeis Special Collections

The Robert D. Farber University Archives & Special Collections house the gems of Brandeis University’s library. They have a blog with monthly spotlights on the collection. July featured the Radical Pamphlets collection, but unfortunately it seems totally dominated by the CPUSA and its fronts. June was the Léon Lipschutz collection of Dreyfusiana and French Judaica. The Hall-Hoag Collection of Extremist Literature in the United States includes far right material and also the likes of the Weather Underground. The Sacco and Venzetti collections are a highlight.

(more…)

From the archive of struggle, no.20

Heroes:

Spain Turns by Roberto. From the International Review, Vol.2 No.3, New York, April 1937

“From 1936 to 1939 a magazine called International Review was published in New York, with contributions from exiles from Germany and other European countries. It was responsible for the first English translation, from the German, of Rosa Luxemburg’s  ‘Reform or Revolution’ and Julius Martov’s ‘The State and the Socialist Revolution’. Its general political line can be best described as “Anti-Bolshevik Marxism”, rejecting Lenin and Trotsky’s vanguardism and arguing that the socialist revolution, to be successful, required the conscious understanding and active participation of the working class.
A MySpace exclusive: this is the first time that this article has appeared on the web.”

[Thanks to Darren for the tip.]

Great George Orwell photo gallery here.

Villains:

Added to the Dolores Ibárruri Archive: Stalin, Leader of Peoples, Man of the Masses, (1940). A lot of people think “La Pasionaria” was a wonderful person, because she came out with that great line about living on your knees or dying on your feet. In fact, at least until late in her life, she was a Stalinist hack, complicit in the murders of people like Andreu Nin and, more directly, Gabriel León Trilla.

Ambivalent:

I only recently found the excellent TheoryAndPractice.org.uk, which mainly archives texts from the ultra-left, including Amadeo Bordiga and Gilles Dauvé (aka Jean Barrot). I am ambivalent about these people: Bordiga fetishisation of the party rivals Lenin’s, and while Dauvé’s critiques of vanguardism are powerful, his anti-anti-fascism is reprehensible. On the other hand, The Communist Club and Julius Martov were cool.